ihadtosee

archaeologicalnews:

image

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have discovered a secret medieval chamber and its ancient loo - hidden for centuries - during a conservation scheme to protect the oldest castle keep in Scotland.

The remarkable discovery has been made at the 700-year-old medieval tower at the National Trust for Scotland’s Drum…

soulbrotherv2:

According to many scholars, the legend of The Lone Ranger is actually based on the life of this african american gentleman:

Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves (Race and Ethnicity in the American West) by Art T. Burton

Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of “eight notable Oklahomans,” the “most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country.” That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas makes his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Bucking the odds (“I’m sorry, we didn’t keep black people’s history,” a clerk at one of Oklahoma’s local historical societies answered a query), Art T. Burton sifts through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late nineteenth-century America—and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era.
 
Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws, and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. A finalist for the 2007 Spur Award, sponsored by the Western Writers of America, Black Gun, Silver Star tells Bass Reeves’s story for the first time and restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

According to many scholars, the legend of The Lone Ranger is actually based on the life of this african american gentleman:
Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of “eight notable Oklahomans,” the “most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country.” That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas makes his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Bucking the odds (“I’m sorry, we didn’t keep black people’s history,” a clerk at one of Oklahoma’s local historical societies answered a query), Art T. Burton sifts through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late nineteenth-century America—and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era.
 
Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws, and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. A finalist for the 2007 Spur Award, sponsored by the Western Writers of America, Black Gun, Silver Star tells Bass Reeves’s story for the first time and restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West. [book link]

archaeologicalnews:

Archaeologists working to identify the Greyfriars remains are reconstructing the 500-year-old skeleton’s face to give people a possible glimpse of King Richard III.

Scientists at the University of Leicester are using techniques similar to those which recreated Tutankhamen’s face more than…

Ray Bradbury (1920-2012)

“If you dream the proper dreams, and share the myths with people, they will want to grow up to be like you.”

historical-nonfiction:

The Moai of Easter Island had a hieroglyphic script, shown above. What does it say? No one knows. It is called Rongorongo, and appeared just in time to be banned  by early European colonizers.

historical-nonfiction:

The Moai of Easter Island had a hieroglyphic script, shown above. What does it say? No one knows. It is called Rongorongo, and appeared just in time to be banned  by early European colonizers.

harvestheart:

Artist John Gurche used the latest forensic techniques, fossil discoveries, and 20 years of experience to create the lifelike reconstructions of early humans on display in the Hall of Human Origins. The painstaking process required a detailed knowledge of human and ape anatomy. It took Gurche 2½ years to complete these busts.

harvestheart:

Artist John Gurche used the latest forensic techniques, fossil discoveries, and 20 years of experience to create the lifelike reconstructions of early humans on display in the Hall of Human Origins. The painstaking process required a detailed knowledge of human and ape anatomy. It took Gurche 2½ years to complete these busts.

harvestheart:

Courtesy Of The Hembree Family  /  Vetstreet.com
Lucas Hembree and his dog Juno. When his dad Chester saw a posting about her on a rescue group’s website “I had the feeling in my gut that I had to go see this dog,” he said.

As nearly anyone who has adopted a dog or cat from a shelter can attest, there’s something special about a rescued pet; it’s as if the animal senses he’s been given a second chance at life. That’s certainly the case with Juno, a Belgian Malinois who was rescued from a shelter just days before she was to be euthanized. But since coming to live with her family in Alcoa, Tenn., Juno has taken on the role of rescuer to four-year-old Lucas Hembree.

harvestheart:

Courtesy Of The Hembree Family  /  Vetstreet.com

Lucas Hembree and his dog Juno. When his dad Chester saw a posting about her on a rescue group’s website “I had the feeling in my gut that I had to go see this dog,” he said.
As nearly anyone who has adopted a dog or cat from a shelter can attest, there’s something special about a rescued pet; it’s as if the animal senses he’s been given a second chance at life. That’s certainly the case with Juno, a Belgian Malinois who was rescued from a shelter just days before she was to be euthanized. But since coming to live with her family in Alcoa, Tenn., Juno has taken on the role of rescuer to four-year-old Lucas Hembree.
militaryhistory:

Sioux Chief, Spotted Eagle. October 31, 1880 

militaryhistory:

Sioux Chief, Spotted Eagle. October 31, 1880